You teach best what you most need to learn. I wasn’t aware that this was a Richard Bach quote (one of my favourite authors) until I looked it up this morning.

One of the keys to staying creative, keeping your thinking fresh and to challenging the status quo is to keep on inputting, to change your scenery every now and then.

The last few months I have been feeling stuck. Winter, cold, grey, uninspired. This week, I am in Kaunas, Lithuania and its like someone punched a hole in the ceiling and let the light back in.

Nothing show-stopping has happened really. Just a two-hour flight and a 90-minute bus ride, but I feel like I have stepped into a new world of possibilities.

This shouldn’t surprise me. All I have done the last 6-months is read books and meet new people, have interesting conversations and think deeply about what I am doing.

It was always just a question of time before my headspace turned from feeling constrained and blocked to me finding a gap, a ray of light, a tiny door to start to squeeze out of.

I am realising more and more that this is how I work… in bursts of highly productive energy interspersed with periods of wide assimilation and introspection.

I used to think this meant I was somewhat diffuse and had a mild sort of attention disorder. But now I realise that this is how I am able to do what I do: make connections where others see none, write poem after poem, train, develop and grow the way that I do, that I have always done.

But possibly more importantly that I am not unique in this way. That this is what creativity requires: a constant return to the source, renewal, rejuvenation, evaluation, rethinking… before the stuff we all like to talk about appears.

I have been in the long dark teatime of the soul (to quote Douglas Adams, another of my favourite authors) and now it’s time to haal uit en wys (dig deep and deliver).